Best Coconut Yogurt Recipe

This easy recipe for creamy, fresh Coconut Yogurt yields the ultimate plant-based probiotic treat. Happily, it’s a breeze to make. At last, a dairy-free version that doesn’t end up tasting strange or require tricky incubator setups and weird thickeners.

Over the years, I experimented with ingredients and equipment to come up with a truly delicious, perfectly tangy yogurt. Unfortunately, probiotic capsules left an unpleasant taste. Furthermore, other ingredients failed to nail the thick, creamy spoonful I was after. Or they made yogurt that separated after sitting. However, my dreams came true when I discovered young coconut meat and pure frozen coconut milk.

These two clean-tasting ingredients eliminated the need for stabilizers and thickeners. The beauty of young coconut meat is it is soft enough to blend. When you add pure, frozen coconut milk without additives, you end up with a lightly sweet, luscious yogurt that sits up on a spoon.

But the really exciting part was learning I could put aside all the thermometers and warming devices. How? The secret is using a mesophilic starter to culture your yogurt. That’s just a fancy way of saying it sours yogurt at room temperature in a covered bowl on the countertop. Isn’t that a miracle?

This recipe for the Best Coconut Yogurt uses Positively Probiotics pure vegan culture. Its coconut base complements the young coconut meat. Plus, it’s the long-awaited answer to making plant-based yogurt at room temperature. Previously, other available mesophilic starters were grown on mediums that were not 100 percent vegan. It’s a jump for joy day now that this culture has arrived.

Are you amazed yet? Hang on, there’s more. Once you have made your first bowlful, you can use a small amount of your homemade yogurt to culture your next batch. If you make yogurt regularly in this way, you won’t have to repurchase the original mesophilic starter culture. You can even use a spoonful of your homemade yogurt to make this smooth Cultured Cashew Cream Cheese, rich in probiotics.

If you don’t want to order mesophilic culture online, you can use two tablespoons of store-bought vegan coconut yogurt as a substitution. I tested it out, and it does work. It won’t have the same sublime flavor that Positively Probiotics heirloom culture gives. Nor can I guarantee the texture of your finished yogurt. However, it will still be heads above anything you can buy in the store.

Just think, only three ingredients, plus a blender, spoon, and bowl. With them, you are on your way to a lifetime of the most luscious plant-based yogurt you have ever tasted.

coconut yogurt ingredients

Best Coconut Yogurt Recipe

Easy, creamy Coconut Yogurt Recipe is plant-based, luscious, only requires three ingredients and cultures at room temperature. Dairy-free and vegan,
Print Recipe Pin Recipe
Course Breakfast, Condiment, Side Dish
Cuisine Cultured Foods, Plant-Based
Servings 7 One-half cup servings
Author poppyswildkitchen

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup rich frozen coconut milk thawed
  • 2 1 lb. packages frozen young coconut meat, (2-3 cups thawed and drained)
  • 4-8 TB. coconut water from package of young coconut meat, optional
  • 1/8 tsp. Positively Probiotic mesophilic starter culture, first batch
  • or
  • 2 TB yogurt, following batches

Instructions

  • Drain thawed young coconut meat in a colander and save coconut water.
  • Place young coconut meat in a Vitamix (preferred) or high speed blender. Add thawed coconut milk and blend on high speed until very smooth. This may take a few minutes. Stop short of mixture getting warm. Temperatures above 105 degrees can kill culture.
  • Add coconut water from drained coconut meat as needed so that yogurt turns freely in blades. Your mixture should be thinner than you want your finished yogurt to be. I aim for a melted ice cream consistency. Yogurt will thicken after it is chilled.
  • Once yogurt is the right consistency, turn the blender down to low speed. With blades moving, sprinkle in 1/8 tsp. of Positively Probiotic mesophilic coconut yogurt culture (for first batch) or 2 tablespoons yogurt (for successive batches). Blend briefly to mix in culture.
  • Pour yogurt into a glass bowl. Allow a couple inches at top for expansion. Cover with a plate.
  • Set on countertop out of direct sunlight. Leave undisturbed to culture.
  • The first batch of yogurt may take up to 12- 24 hours to become tangy and rich with healthy probiotics. This varies a great deal with climate. Future batches finish in as little as 8 hours in a warm climate.
  • Before the yogurt becomes tangy, it will become fluffy and expand a little. That is a good sign. Use it as a signal to taste your yogurt to see if it is tart enough. When it is a little milder than you want the finished recipe to be, stir it down and refrigerate. It will grow more tart and thicken as it chills.
  • Chill yogurt for 6 hours or overnight before using. Yogurt keeps well for two weeks. For best results, take a small amount out and start a new batch of yogurt every week.

Notes

Ethnic markets that carry Filipino foods are a good source for frozen young coconut meat and milk. Here is a link to order vegan coconut-base culture: PositivelyProbiotic.com
A Vitamix or similar high powered machine makes the smoothest yogurt, but a regular blender is fine if you don’t mind a little coconut texture to your yogurt.
Be sure to keep the mixture lukewarm at most while mixing. The ideal temperate for mesophilic cultures is 77-86 degrees. Temperatures lower than 50 degrees or higher than 108 will stop the growth of beneficial bacteria.
 
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Elisem
Elisem
10 months ago

Hi Poppy, I would love to try this recipe but have no idea where to find the frozen coconut meat, my goal is then to make the creamcheese!

poppyswildkitchen
Admin
10 months ago
Reply to  Elisem

Aloha Elise. Locally you can find the coconut meat at Island Grocery in Lahaina and Napili Market. It might be available at the Filipino market across from the old Ace Hardware store. It is often called “buko” in ethnic markets. That is so exciting the cream cheese is on your list!